Susan Sontag Essays

Susan Sontag Essays-72
So I knew, before even picking up this book, that the writing was going to be decent and that this was one of those important writers that I should know and understand. She's very philosophical and incredibly challenging to read, which I truly enjoyed.

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There's an essay on religious fervor called "Pity Without Content" which addresses the issue lacking our more passionate perspective 50 years on.

Another problem for me is that much of her work in Against Interpretation concerns European film, art, and writing.

They generally only dedicate books to writings that have made a difference or are important in the world and I really like that about them.

So I knew, before even picking up this book, that the writing was going to be decent and that this was one of those important writers that I should know and understand. She's very philosophical and incredibly chall I generally like reading books by Library of America because they expose me to authors of importance.

38: “Camp is the consistently aesthetic experience of the world.

It incarnates a victory of “style” over “content,” “aesthetics” over “morality,” of irony over tragedy. 8, which declares camp to be “the love of the exaggerated, the ‘off,’ of things-being-what-they-are-not.”But what about 27?This volume brings together four essential works of the 1960s and 70s, books whose intelligence and brilliant style confirm her credo that “the highest duty of a writer is to write well—to leave the language in better rather than worse shape after one’s passage…Language is the body, and also the soul, of consciousness.”With the publication of her first collection of critical essays, (1966), Sontag took her place at the forefront of a period of cultural and political transformation.“What is important now,” she wrote, “is to recover our senses…In place of a hermeneutics we need an erotics of art.” ’s treatment of an astonishing range of subjects—camp sensibility, the films of Robert Bresson and Alain Resnais, the aesthetics of science-fiction and “happenings,” the work of such modern thinkers as Simone Weil and Antonin Artaud, Michel Leiris and Claude Lévi-Strauss—reveals Sontag as a catalyzing figure who opened provocative perspectives on every subject she addressed. Cioran (one of many important modern writers Sontag introduced to American readers), and “Trip to Hanoi,” the record of a journey made at the height of the Vietnam War, reflecting both her deepening political involvement and the relentless analysis of her own motives that accompanied it.Add to that the age of her material and it's not surprising that her subjects are somewhat obscure, a litany of familiar names with which I have no real experience except that I've heard of them.Still, reading Sontag feels like reading truth whether or not it really is convincingly true because she writes so well and so engagingly about her subjects. I generally like reading books by Library of America because they expose me to authors of importance.Sontag’s own medical crisis led her to write Illness as (1978), undoubtedly the most influential of her writings.Her precise delineation of the stereotypes and fantasies attached to illnesses—here, tuberculosis and cancer—played a major part in realizing her stated goal: “an elucidation of those metaphors, and a liberation from them.” The courage and clarity of her writing, her impatience with lazy assumptions and inherited biases, are evident on every page.More than a commentator on her era, she helped shape it.This volume brings together four essential works of the 1960s and 70s, books whose intelligence and bril Susan Sontag was an incandescent presence in American culture, whether as essayist, fiction writer, filmmaker, or political activist.I found her essays to be rather interesting and I found myself very curious as to what she would have to say about the different subjects.This collection was put together in a logical manner.

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