Satire Essay On Welfare

Satire Essay On Welfare-9
Swift may be more skilled than any other English satirist in the speed with which he leads readers from their comfortable absorption in the "normal truth-telling" discourse to the Projector's sudden descents into foolish (Horatian) or criminal (Juvenalian) assumptions.

Swift may be more skilled than any other English satirist in the speed with which he leads readers from their comfortable absorption in the "normal truth-telling" discourse to the Projector's sudden descents into foolish (Horatian) or criminal (Juvenalian) assumptions.

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Why do you think that Swift chose to use the devouring of children’s flesh as the basis of this proposal? For instance, Montaigne's essay "Of Cannibals" argued that, though they ate human flesh, the cannibals were more noble than we were in their other conduct; Jonson's Volpone, suggested that Europeans' greed turned them into animals who preyed upon one another (see the I.1 "duet" between Volpone and Mosca in which they praise Volpone for what he do, but others will, in pursuit of money); Behn's Oroonoko, argued that sophisticated Europeans were more debased than the "Natural Man" (compare especially the behavior of the Native Americans vs.

the colonists' debauchery on Sundays, the day of the slaves' revolt).

Swift's most potent weapon against readers' indifference toward the Irish poor was his satire's rhetorical style.

All satirists take advantage of readers' willingness to believe that they are reading "normal truth-telling" unless warned otherwise, and from the title to the introductory description of the economic problem besetting the Irish, this strategy is pursued by Swift's speaker (usually called "the Projector," as in one who proposes "projects" to remedy social ills).

Form: "City Shower" is in heroic couplets, rhyming pairs of loose iambic pentameter lines (with a few extra syllables tucked in there when necessary.

Its style is "mock heroic." For a modern parody of the style, see "Al Pope"'s Swift’s "Projector" persona, the Irish poor, and Irish and English readers, in "A Modest Proposal"; in "City Shower," a survey of typical "town" types, rather like the General Prologue of "Canterbury Tales," but concentrating on the new city-scape of the seventeenth century: Susan, the Templar, the "sempstress," Tories, Whigs, and beaux.

This has the effect of literalizing the metaphor as the butchery, sale, and consumption of the "product" are worked out.

This also was a satirical strategy we saw in Jonson's because they both use satire to discuss the welfare of society.

In C17 editions of "Modest Proposal" some of the text was italicized in order to emphasis the meaning of these sections. One of the infuriating things about the "Proposer"'s or "Projector"'s voice is its serene rationalism.

Usually these sections contained Swift’s personal feelings or attitudes toward modern issues of poverty and poverty (esp. All of its rhetoric imitates the ideal C17 public speaker's tone of sweet reason and enlightened concern for the well-being of others. The scariest part of the essay may be when the argument turns to the suggestion that, if the Irish were offered the chance to kill their children, they might prefer it to seeing them grow up in such total poverty (cf. Though the typical student reading of this "proposal" is that the morally bankrupt "Proposer" wishes to sell Irish babies to the absentee English landlords, the narrator specifically points out that this is because "this kind of commodity will not bear exportation, the flesh being of too tender a consistence to admit a long continuance in salt, although I perhaps I could name a country which would be glad to eat up our whole nation without it." That's Swift's closest approach to the "English landlords eating Irish babies" reading, and he turns it into a hypothetical metaphor in the end.

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