Hinduism And Buddhism Research Paper

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As the emblem of Pāśupata identity, representations of the deified teacher called Lakulīśa (the ‘Lord with a Club’) became a prominent feature of the expanding Śaiva religious landscape in early medieval northwest India. more As the emblem of Pāśupata identity, representations of the deified teacher called Lakulīśa (the ‘Lord with a Club’) became a prominent feature of the expanding Śaiva religious landscape in early medieval northwest India.

This study works to recover some of Lakulīśa’s historical contingency by reading his appearance in both text and image as a reflection of or response to particular concerns of the developing Śaiva religious community.

The monograph brings theoretical advances in Anglo- European material culture and material religion studies into a conversation with South Asian anthropology, sociology, art history, and religion.

Ultimately, it demonstrates how embodied interactions as well as representations shape ISKCON’s practitioners as devout subjects, while connecting them with the divine and the wider community. The paper describes the ideas of ancient Koreans about the formation of local Buddhist artistic canon, as represented in “Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms” (Samguk yusa, 13th cent.).

This is particularly noticeable at rock art sites that used to be, and often still are, seasonal pastoral campsites.

In fact, in the Mongolian Altai Mountains, ancient rock art engravings can be often found at present pastoral campsites, as it has been verified after several fieldworks in the research area of the Ikh Bogd Uul Mountain, Eastern Altai, Southern Mongolia (see figure).With his attributes signifying power, fertility, and protection, I suggest that Lakulīśa functioned not only as a potent sign of Pāśupata identity, but as a multivalent persona, facets of which would have resonated with a broader religious community.In Clothing as Devotion in Contemporary Hinduism, Urmila Mohan explores the materiality and visuality of cloth and clothing as devotional media in contemporary Hinduism.The significance of Lakulīśa’s literary debut in the Nepalese recension of the early Skandapurāṇa is examined first.I then explore the visual representations of this figure by considering patterns in Lakulīśa’s iconography and the place of his images within sanctified spaces.Long-term pastoral returns to seasonal settlement areas in Central Asian Mountains have been also demonstrated by archaeological and radio-carbon analysis (Frachetti & Maryashev, 2007; Lugli, 2008).In this study, I propose to analyse this correspondence from the point of view of persistent rituality.Drawing upon ethnographic research into the global missionizing group “International Society for Krishna Consciousness” (ISKCON), she studies translocal spaces of worship, service, education, and daily life in the group’s headquarters in Mayapur and other parts of India.Focusing on the actions and values of deity dressmaking, devotee clothing and paraphernalia, Mohan shows how activities, such as embroidery and chanting, can be understood as techniques of spirituality, reverence, allegiance—and she proposes the new term “efficacious intimacy” to help understand these complex processes.In fact, as the seasonal movements of the local pastoral communities, rituality appears intrinsically connected with reiteration and cyclicity (Baumann, 2008).In this paper, I aim to explore the hypothesis that the materialisation of ancient cosmologies and symbolism in Mongolian rock art images may be interpreted in the light of the rituality entangled in the periodical returns and cyclical mobility of the local pastoral communities over time.

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