Essay On Cross-Cultural Conflict

Essay On Cross-Cultural Conflict-81
This essay, however, does not seek to repeat the above-mentioned aspects of our class presentation , that is, word for word.Instead, the goal of the essay is to critically and deeply reflect on and analyze the most relevant themes, insights and questions that emerged from the readings and class discussions, and to reexamine one of the real-life conflict situations that was discussed during the presentation.Put differently and in the words of David Augsburger (1992), it is a clash between a low-context (individualistic) culture and a high-context (collectivistic) culture.

This essay, however, does not seek to repeat the above-mentioned aspects of our class presentation , that is, word for word.Instead, the goal of the essay is to critically and deeply reflect on and analyze the most relevant themes, insights and questions that emerged from the readings and class discussions, and to reexamine one of the real-life conflict situations that was discussed during the presentation.Put differently and in the words of David Augsburger (1992), it is a clash between a low-context (individualistic) culture and a high-context (collectivistic) culture.

Tags: Russia And World War 1 EssayCreative Writing Online JobsCritical Thinking In ResearchWrite Essay Gender StudiesExample Of Term Paper In EnglishVancouver Essay WritingDissertation Medical EthicsCreative Writing Classes AtlantaDrug Alcohol Abuse Among Young People EssayPro Same Sex Marriage Essay

The one is a conflict between a powerful individual named Okonkwo and his society.

The other is a collision or clash of cultures between the European-western systems and practices and the Igbo-Nigerian traditional systems and practices.

Rereading Achebe’s (1959) “Things Fall Apart” through the lenses of Augsburger’s (1992) distinction between a low-context (individualistic) culture and a high-context (collectivistic) culture sheds light on the symbolism, significance and signification of the personality of the powerful Okonkwo, as well as the Igbo traditional cultural system and the culture of the European colonizers.

In “Things Fall Apart,” Augsburger’s (1992) idea of a collectivistic culture could be denoted by the characteristics of the Igbo traditional cultural system while an individualistic culture could be generally interpreted as designating the cultural systems, practices and beliefs of the Western colonial countries.

On September 14, 2016, Melinda Burrell, Mariya Mironova (my colleagues at the NSU’s Department of Conflict Resolution Studies) and I, Basil Ugorji, facilitated the culture and conflict class presentation discussion on “Approaches to Culture and Conflict Resolution.” Drawing on chapters 3-5 of Augsburger’s (1992) book, “Conflict Mediation across Cultures, as well as Moore and Woodrow’s (2004) article, “Mapping Cultures: Strategies for Effective Intercultural Negotiations,” our joint presentation explored and examined important aspects of culture and conflict resolution, particularly, the role that culture plays in conflict and conflict resolution, similarities and differences of the assigned readings, literature review of the previous weeks’ readings, and Brexit as a real life conflict.

The presentation ended with an analysis of the readings, and a reflection on the lessons learned from John Kerry’s August 23, 2016 diplomatic visit to Nigeria.I had the privilege of reading “The Symbolism of Evil” (Ricoeur, 1967), “Hermeneutics and Human Sciences: Essays on Language, Action and Interpretation” (Ricoeur, 1981), “The Conflict of Interpretations: Essays in Hermeneutics” (Ricoeur, 1974), “Freedom and Nature: The Voluntary and the Involuntary” (Ricoeur, 1966), “History and Truth Ricoeur,1965), “The Rule of Metaphor: Multi-Disciplinary Studies of the Creation of Meaning in Language” (Ricoeur, 1977), and “Interpretation Theory: Discourse and the Surplus of Meaning” (Ricoeur, 1976).In addition to Paul Ricoeur’s works, I developed interest in Ernst Cassirer’s (1979) “Symbol, Myth and Culture” as well as the bestselling and widely read “Things Fall Apart,” a novel written by Chinua (1959) which narrates two seemingly distinct but interrelated stories about culture and conflict.It is a good thing to postulate cultural arguments, especially from the hermeneutic perspective.Moreover, it is better to show both the cultural arguments and the practical steps through which conflicts with cultural elements could be resolved.In doing so, the essay seeks to explore the answers to the following four questions: What is the place of culture in conflict and conflict resolution?In other words, how could the lessons learned from John Kerry’s recent visit to Nigeria shape our understanding of culture, conflict and conflict resolution?Augsburger’s (1992) “Conflict Mediation Across Cultures” and Moore and Woodrow’s (2004) article, “Mapping Cultures: Strategies for Effective Intercultural Negotiations,” are very handy, relevant and important in that they not only lay out the theoretical principles underlying culture, they also outline practical ideas for resolving and mediating culture-based conflicts.These theories, and conflict resolution approaches to culture-based conflicts, will be carefully analyzed in the next section of this essay.What are the various notions of culture in the conflict resolution literature, and how are they different or similar?What happens when a low-context culture and a high-context culture collide?

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Essay On Cross-Cultural Conflict

The Latest from s-gsm.ru ©